Jenny Reeder


Stylin’ with XHTML and CSS: Emotional Attachment
January 29, 2007, 9:09 pm
Filed under: Uncategorized

I must admit: when I first read Luke Wroblewski’s comment about the importance of a succesful website to “establish lasting emotional ties,” I was perplexed. I wrote in my margin, “Does a website establish lasting emotional ties?” After just a few paragraphs, I quickly changed my mind. And now I want to learn how to use my personality–or the personality I want for my website–to attract my audience.

Websites have a definite feel. From professional to amateur, from warm to cool, from active to calm–color, space, font, shapes, style, texture–all communicate personality and emotion. Donald A. Norman mentions the connection between the emotional system and the cognitive system. I love the idea that the way I present my website can incite visitors to think more creatively. “Happy people are more effective in finding alternative solutions and, as a result, are tolerant of minor difficulties.”

As I read Wroblewski, I realize that I want my site (certainly a work in progress) to be cooler (rather than red–I want to focus on the soothing, calmly invigorating parts of Mormon women’s history rather than inciting the strange, negative, highly conflicted aspects); personable (I want images of real women from a bunch of times, ages, races, etc.); with sort of an older feel (I want my site to be clean but to feel a connection to the past, with sort of grainy sepia photos).

I am reminded of the importance of understanding audience. Wroblewski continually refers to appealing to audience, to being consistent and clear for the audience, to meeting audience expectations, getting the correct message to the audience. There is clearly a connection between the site’s emotional draw and returned use.

Now… as to how to accomplish these emotions… I’m still working through Charles Wyke-Smith’s Stylin’ with CSS which provides great technical information…

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8 Comments so far
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But Jenny, you have already established a personality on your blog–I frankly would love to meet some of those women in the photo on the top. Especially the older woman seated on the far left–I have no idea why she intrigues me. Guess that is part of the appeal. Since you site will be so heavily tied to a certain period, I would encourage you to find out about the design sense of that period. What type of furnishings did they prefer to surround themselves with? You already have a leg up with your quilting background.

Comment by Misha Griffith

I have to agree with Misha here…I like what you have going. It reminds me other blogs and pages I’ve seen that are clean and sharp, and leading off with an intriguing historic photo is certainly a way to catch attention I think. Great suggestion from Misha on extending the design too!

Comment by Jennifer Levasseur

I second your decision to use personality in web development. If we are honest, anything we write, draw, or program has a bit of our personality. The key is bring it to our topic in a way that enhances the presentation. I do not think we can nor should separate our personality from the history we present, and it can not help but come out in a web site. Part of our personality is how we are historically passionate about our particular areas of history. That can be used to pull interest in. I see that in a 7th grade history class, when the last thing on their mind is an interest in history. We must make our presentation engaging if we care about people looking at what we have done. Even if we are only publishing web sites for other academics, we must make it engaging enough to get their attention.

Mark S.

Comment by Mark Stevens

Well Jenny, I guess I’ll throw my two cents in as well. I do agree that websites have personality just as books, articles, films, any kind of visual media do. But your first reaction to Wroblewski’s comment about “establish lasting emotional ties” is the one I had as well, but still have.

I think websites, just like the other previously-mentioned media, all leave you with a feeling, or gut-reaction or whatever. But, and maybe this is me being too tradional-thinking (which is crazy because in almost every other way I am one of the most non-traditional folks I know), books and movies leave much more of a lasting impact on me emotionally than websites do. Have I just not found the right one yet? I feel like an unemotional outsider in this discussion! 😦

Comment by SaS

By the way, is your time on some wierd setting? Mine says I left it at 2:11 am on Wednesday morning yet it is 5:11 pm on Tues. night! Are you set to Paris time or maybe even Vienna??

Comment by SaS

[…] critique that trust through design can be easily abused to Jenny Reeder’s desire to create emotional attachments to her websites through design. It looks to be a really interesting class this semester, and goes to show that study of the field […]

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Comment by unsopay

Привет.
Продаю персональный сертификат WebMoney за $99.

Можете проверить: WMID 322973398779 Redfern

Всё чисто, не одной жалоб. Сделан на утерянные документы. Всё законно.
Если нужно, то есть сертификаты ещё.
Стучацо в личную почту на Вебмани.

Это не спам. Не пишите на мой WMID жалобы в арбитраж Вебмани.

Comment by unsopay




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